Charlottetown

Charlottetown: Top 10

(continuer en français) – Last updated: December 18, 2020

As the capital of the smallest of Canada’s provinces, it sometimes feels as if life stopped 150 years ago, a perception reinforced by the island effect. Yet it was here that Canada was created, at the 1864 Conference, ironically, Prince Edward Island did not join until 1873. Overlooking a beautiful natural bay, the city makes for a pleasant destination.

01. Fanningbank

As in other provinces, the Lieutenant-Governor’s residence seems somewhat out of proportion to his or her current role. Formerly a representative of the king, he decided everything that was done on the island. Fanningbank dates back to 1834 and continues to welcome members of the royal family on travel. The public is also admitted for visits.

02. Province House

The Legislative Assembly has met at Province House since 1847. It was also the site of the 1864 conference that led to the creation of Canadian Confederation. This part of the building is managed by Parks Canada, which has recreated the mid-19th century decor around the Confederation Chamber. The building has been closed for renovation since 2015.

03. Victoria Row

Traffic is suspended during the summer on Victoria Row allowing the terraces to grow. Everything is done to maintain the 19th century atmosphere, from the cobblestones of the causeway to the Victorian facades of restaurants and art shops. Regularly actors in costume are passed by, always ready to allow themselves to be photographed, plunging into the past.

04. Veterans Memorial

These three determined Canadian soldiers marching towards battle pay tribute to the islanders who fell in the Great War. Installed in 1925 in front of Province Hall, the monument later came to honour the dead of the Second World War and the wars in Korea and Afghanistan.

05. St. Dunstan’s Cathedral Basilica

The Catholic Cathedral occupies the site where three churches were built between 1816 and 1916. The present building was erected following a fire. The French Gothic style was preserved with English Victorian influences. Two high spires can be seen from all over the city, guiding towards the centre. It was raised to the rank of basilica in 1929.

06. St. Paul’s Anglican Church

Anglican rectors have been present on the island since 1769 but they did not have a place of worship until 1803. The Anglican Church of St. Paul was completed in 1896 in local red stone, its Gothic Revival style is quite common at the time, inspired by the European churches of the 15th century. The present church succeeds two other churches and takes over some of their elements.

07. Great George Street

Great George Street is a downtown street running from the Parliament building to the harbour and passing several prominent buildings. It is a shady street lined with rows of mainly Georgian-style houses. It is a shady street lined with rows of mainly Georgian-style houses, where visitors can enjoy the tranquility of the city as well as travel back in time as if nothing had changed since the middle of the 19th century.

08. Beaconfield House

Beaconfield House is one of the most elegant houses in town. Built in 1877 for a wealthy merchant and shipbuilder, it had all the comforts of the time, such as gas lighting and running water. The house is now open to the public as an example of Victorian elegance on Prince Edward Island.

09. Great George Inn

In the heart of the Old Town, Great George Inn is an elegant hotel dating back to 1846. At one time converted into a store, it was once again a hotel to accommodate some of the delegations to the 1864 Conference. The current owner has expanded the hotel by gradually buying back the thirteen old houses next door, forming a unique historical complex.

10. Rodd Hotel

Built in 1931 by CN Railways, Rodd Charlottetown follows the tradition of luxury hotels operated by the railways. The hotel is tastefully decorated in the old-fashioned style, with marble floors and stylish furnishings, offering large function rooms at the centre of Chalottetown’s social life. A rooftop terrace overlooks the entire town with a view of the bay.

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