Tamarindo or Tamagringo

(continuer en français) – Published: March 21, 2021

Tamarindo beach on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica is probably the most frequented beach in the country by foreign tourists, especially beginner surfers attracted by the easier waves. To the point of earning the unappealing nickname of Tamagringo.

So don’t expect to discover the lifestyle of the Ticos, the nickname of the Costa Ricans, and it’s difficult to see the pura vida here. At best, one can see a few farms from the dusty roads on the way there. In Tamarindo, the traditional village is located several kilometres inland from the coastline, where foreign visitors congregate.

Although the distance from the capital San José is only 155 miles, 250 kilometres, the roads are not very fast and it takes a good half-day’s journey by car or bus. Arriving from abroad it is easier to land at Liberia airport, 46 miles, 75 kilometres away, which is mainly designed to accommodate tourist flights.

As a result, the level of quality standards in Tamarindo, and therefore prices, is higher than in the rest of Costa Rica. More than anywhere else, there are hotels, restaurants, shops and even a French bakery run by foreign residents, often with experience from their home country. It is true that an expatriate can indeed consider settling in Tamarindo to run a profitable business.

The locals, however, provide the necessary labour to keep the resort running. Many of them come to take advantage of the presence of foreign visitors to try to earn some money. On the beach, they regularly pass by to offer their services, such as these cleverly constructed carts selling various sweets or ice creams directly where the holidaymakers are.

As everywhere in Costa Rica, there is a diversified offer of recreational activities. On a stay of several days it will be possible to vary the occupations. Nearby, there is a mangrove, sea turtle nesting grounds and even populations of sloths and crocodiles. To get around, bicycles, horses and ATVs are available.

Of course, everything that revolves around water can be practiced in Tamarindo, whether it is surfing, windsurfing, kayaking, jet skiing, snorkeling or diving, it is all possible and accessible. Small shops selling tours or renting equipment are numerous along the beach. Surfing remains the dominant activity, mainly for beginners, but there are a couple of interesting breaks for the more experienced.

Walking, running, cycling along the beach, especially when low tide uncovers a firmer stretch of sand, is the easiest activity in Tamarindo. There is the entertainment of bathers and surfers, but also the performance of pelicans taking off heavily, gliding for a moment before swooping vertically in pursuit of a fish unwisely close to the surface.

Given the heat, it is tempting to spend the hottest part of the day in the drafts under the shade of the palm trees. Several straw huts await the holidaymaker whose ambition is to do nothing. Even offering to dine in this relaxing setting, with the table in the sand.

Then comes the sunset. Tamarindo is ideally positioned, facing west to watch the sun go down towards the horizon.

To be informed of upcoming articles, register here (it’s free).

 

Articles about Costa Rica:

Teatro Nacional, San José, Costa Rica

San José: Top 10

Costa Rica is best known for its natural parks and beaches, but just as a capital does not reflect a country, to know a country, it is necessary to know its capital. San José replaced Cartago as the country’s capital in 1823.

Road trip in the Highlands

The Central American isthmus is built around a series of cordilleras to which the coastal plains cling. In the tropics, the humid heat of the plains is often difficult to bear away from the coastline, which benefits from the sea breeze. The hills in the centre of the country were therefore the first region to be colonised by the Spaniards due to their more suitable climate.

Highlands, Costa Rica
Playa Espedilla Sur, Manuel Antonio National Park, Costa Rica

Manuel Antonio National Park

The beaches at Manuel Antonio National Park are often classified as the most beautiful beaches in Costa Rica, which has no shortage of charming beaches on both its oceanic facades. Their ribbon of fine sand, set against a backdrop of lush greenery, rightly constitutes an image worth keeping to illustrate a successful stay in Costa Rica.

Jacó and its surf beaches

On the Pacific coast, Jacó is the closest seaside resort to San José, the capital of Costa Rica, less than two hours away by car. Jacó is enjoying the development without it being too much of a burden, there is a little modern air to it, but still with many imperfections that are part of Costa Rica’s charm.

Playa Jacó, Jacó, Costa Rica
Tamarindo, Costa Rica

Tamarindo or Tamagringo

Tamarindo beach on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica is probably the most frequented beach in the country by foreign tourists, especially beginner surfers attracted by the easier waves. To the point of earning the unappealing nickname of Tamagringo. So don’t expect to discover the lifestyle of the Ticos, the nickname of the Costa Ricans, and it’s difficult to see the pura vida here.

To be informed of upcoming articles, register here (it’s free).

19 comments

    • I also drove through Nosara and Guiones which I found much more natural with houses mixed in with nature. Tamarindo, with its more classical aspect, may also appeal to those looking for this type of comfort. Thanks for commenting, better days are on the way!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. My only two experiences with Costa Rica involved docking at Puntarenas, but the two excursions, one to a jungle cruise and one to Natua Wildlife Refuge are both highlights of my cruising experiences over the years.
    I understand there are many North American expats retired in the country.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Costa Rica is working hard to preserve nature and make it accessible to visitors. I’m glad you were able to enjoy it. I noticed more expats working than retired in Costa Rica. However, pensioners are more evident in some parts of Panama, which will be my next stop. Thanks for reading.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s